Gluten Free Flour Mixes

Idy’s Different Homemade Gluten Free Flour Mixes

( All purpose flour and 100 % Whole grain flour blend )


Below was my status update on facebook a couple weeks ago. Still relevant. Still going strong at my test kitchen sessions. Still at it. I made 4 different GF cakes today and 3 yesterday. Baking and cooking away is my therapy.

In therapy these past days –Test Kitchen Sanity Workout. Therapy sessions of: Homemade pasta sauces. Orange ginger marmalade. Fiddled with my Gluten Free homemade mixes for GF pancakes, wraps, cakes, GF All purpose flour blends, GF 100 % whole grain blends, puddings, savory crepes, crackers, scones & biscuits (made a lot of doorstops & hockey pucks from these sessions btw)… just the same, HAPPY AS A PIG IN MUD! Already broke the poor dishwasher from overuse . Still, I carry on.

Paneer cheese & greek yogurt. Mock cocktails. GF savory crepe fillings. Practicing Floral arranging & tablescapes in between. I’m all over the place. :-)

My teeny micro kitchen has never gotten in the way of my lofty cooking ambitions. Give me a closet, I’ll still find a way to cook in there. :-) 

Yup, that’s me at the grocery checkout, with flour in my hair , carrying almond meal in one hand & meyer lemons in another, deep in thought thinking of how I can fit half a grassfed cow in my small freezer (Foodie daydreaming). 

On to GF pasta making now, GF pizza dough and roasting spice mixes. All counter space, tables, chairs are all used up for “stuff”. “You have to eat again on the floor, kids. Hubby, how about the stairs.” 

Food processor, mortar & pestle, sous chefs (the kids) , juicer, & vitamix on overdrive. We’re all stirring, peeling, scrubbing, sweeping, scraping, burning :-) , chopping, washing, taste testing. Ayyyyyyloveeeeeet! :-)

 

Gluten Free Flour Mixes ( All purpose flour and Whole grain flour blend )


To make your own Gluten Free all purpose flour , combine 2 parts whole grain flours ( ex. sorghum, brown rice, millet , quinoa, corn, buckwheat, amaranth, teff, etc.) to one 1 part starch ( ex. cornstarch, arrowroot, tapioca ).

 

I often do more whole grain flour combinations like 3 parts whole grain flour and 1 part starch, just because it’s way better for you and it still works.


 

Homemade Gluten Free Pancake mixes and GF Flour Blends

We don’t use store bought Gluten Free flours at our house because we prefer whole grain flours as much as possible. No one in our family is celiac or gluten intolerant. My hubby still loves making his whole wheat bread and whole wheat pizzas during the weekends. We just like variety in our eating and I like a good challenge. I have many friends who are gluten free & this inspired me to try gluten free eating as a way of baking, since I am fascinated with all those alternative gluten free whole grain flours such as teff, millet, quinoa, amaranth, sweet brown rice, sorghum, buckwheat, etc. We use these different whole grains a lot in our cooking but baking with them is another world for me. That is why I have decided to delve into the the world of gluten free baking at this chapter in my life just because I find it exciting and challenging. I’ve even gone further and tweaked here and there my recipes , to accommodate the dairy free, refined flour free, sugar free, nut free, pro- fermented & probiotic, and high raw eating folks. I’m all over the place and loving it. As long as I know that the recipes use ingredients that come as near as possible to how God created them (they do not use highly processed ingredients, preferably organic and Non-GMO), it’s all good to me.

 

There’s a saying, “The whiter the bread, the sooner you’re dead! “ I also have my own saying, “The whiter the rice, the sooner your goodbyes! The whiter the products, the fatter your buttocks!” We all know that white flours ,white sugar, white rice, refined flours are all devoid of nourishing nutrients.


Anyway, most of the Gluten Free all purpose flour mixes out there seem to have 50 to 100 percent white starches like potato starch, tapioca starch, corn starch,  white rice flour, and white glutinous rice flour. It’s what makes the finished product fluffy and soft. Many of the mixes also use a lot of sugar, especially with the pancake mixes and muffin/cake mixes ( Sugar is the first main ingredient).If it is not sugar, it usually is a white starch. It just defeats the purpose of trying to eat healthier when you use mixes like that. The whole point for those shifting to gluten free eating is to be able to improve one’s health. How will your gluten free eating be beneficial if you eat refined and highly processed products? I just like to know that what we are eating will be nourishing instead of detrimental to our health, even if the finished product may be of a heartier texture , won’t be the fluffiest at times and not as sweet as what most are used to. I’ll take my homemade mixes over those store bought mixes anytime. If I am going to give a home baked GF cake to a non GF, I’ll probably sneak in a little of the starches just for that extra fluffy texture that they are so used to.

 

You will be delightfully surprised though to know that you can use 100% whole grain flours  in your cake recipes and it will still come out great! I kid you not! As long as you combine in right proportions the sticky binding grain flours with the non-sticky ones , and/or use extra binder like chia seed gel or flax seed gel, you can get a great cake! The grains that bind well are buckwheat, sweet brown rice, bean flour, teff, amaranth.They absorb liquid more than the other grains. Use that with the regular grain flours. With the right proportion of flour, eggs, chia gel, and oil, you can achieve good textured 100% whole grain cakes and breads that taste good.


My Gluten Free 100% Whole Grain Banana Cake is an example of a 100% whole grain cake with no starches .

 

I don’t like to use xanthan gum or guar gum as binder either because I don’t think they are that natural. A lot of people have mentioned having problems digesting these gums too. These gums are still new and full side effects unknown. These gums are really unnecessary as many gluten free bakers have found out. You’ll be surprised it can even make for a better product if you leave those gums out, considering you have other better alternatives like chia seeds and/or flax seeds as binder.

 

I like using chia seed-flax seed blend in lieu of xanthan gum or guar gum. I add 1/4 cup of Very thick viscosity chia gel to wet ingredients in my cake batters.

 

I order most of my organic grains, organic flour, cold pressed coconut extra virgin coconut oil, organic nuts, sea salts, rapadura sugar, raw honey, organic seasonings, sprouting seeds, organic beans, unsulphured dried fruits, grass fed meat and eggs, etc. from Azure standard website. They have the BEST prices out there for all that. They deliver once a month to our area, with no shipping charges, and it’s like Christmas morning, when we open up our boxes. For our day to day needs , we shop at Costco and Trader Joe’s . They carry great gluten free grains like organic quinoa, organic brown rice, ghee, extra virgin olive oil, organic frozen fruits, organic spinach, organic carrots, organic spring salad mixes, various organic dried fruits and fresh fruits, organic raw almond butter and cashew butter, and many more.

 

Below are different Gluten Free flour blends that you can use. I have different kinds because you may have special diet needs that require stricter flour blends or you just want to try different kinds of flours. This gives you options. According to many gluten bakers out there, the more variety of grains in your flour blend, the better results in the final product. This is because you combine all the different properties ( density, binder, mouth feel, texture, nuttiness, distinct taste, etc) of all the different flours so they blend together and give it that overall balance.

 

Idy’s Gluten Free Flour Blend Recipes

 

Idy’s 100 % Whole grain Gluten Free Flour Blend 1 ( 8 kinds of flour )

 

Yield: 4 Cups

 

½ cup millet flour

½ cup sorghum/ milo flour

½ cup quinoa flour

½ cup corn flour

½ cup brown rice flour

½ cup sweet brown rice flour

½ cup buckwheat flour or teff flour

½ garbanzo bean flour

 

Mix all the grain flours together.

 

Add 1/4 cup *Very Thick Viscosity Chia Seed gel to wet ingredients, for every 2 cups of this 100% whole grain flour blend.

 

 

Idy’s 100 % Whole grain Gluten Free Flour Blend 2

 

Yield: 4 cups

 

1 cup millet flour

1 cup sorghum flour

1 cup quinoa flour

1/2 cup buckwheat flour

1/2 cup garbanzo flour

 

Add 1/4 cup *Very Thick Viscosity Chia Seed gel to wet ingredients, for every 2 cups of this 100% whole grain flour blend.

 

 

Idy’s 100 % Whole grain Gluten Free Flour Blend 3

 

Yield: 4 cups

 

1 1/2 cups millet flour

1 1/2 cups sorghum flour

1/2 cup quinoa

1/2 cup teff , buckwheat or amaranth flour

 

Add 1/4 cup *Very Thick Viscosity Chia gel to wet ingredients, for every 2 cups of this 100% whole grain flour blend.

 

 

Idy’s 100 % Whole grain Gluten Free Flour Blend 4

 

Yield: 4 cups

 

1 1/2 cups millet flour

1 1/2 cups sorghum flour

1/2 cup quinoa

1/2 cup teff , buckwheat, or amaranth flour

 

Add 1/4 cup *Very Thick Viscosity Chia Seed gel to wet ingredients, for every 2 cups of this 100% whole grain flour blend.

 

 

Idy’s 100 % Whole grain Gluten Free Flour Blend 5

 

Yield: 4 cups

 

1 1/4 cups sorghum flour

1 1/4 cups millet flour

1 cup brown rice flour

1/2 cup sweet brown rice flour

 

Add 1/4 cup *Very Thick Viscosity Chia Seed gel to wet ingredients, for every 2 cups of this 100% whole grain flour blend.

 

 

Idy’s Simple Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Blend 1

 

 

Ratio: 2 parts whole grain to 1 part starch

Yield: 4.5 cups

 

1 cup sorghum flour/milo or corn flour

1 cup millet or brown rice flour

1 cup buckwheat flour or teff flour


1.5 cup starch ( tapioca, potato, and/or arrowroot combination )

You can also use nut flour, bean flour ( garbanzo / fava) or coconut flour in place of one of the whole grains.

 

Idy’s Gluten Free All Purpose flour Blend 2

 

Ratio: 2 cups whole grain to 1 part starch

Yield: 3 cups

 

1 1/2 cup buckwheat flour or other whole grain flour like quinoa, amaranth, millet, corn, milo/sorghum, brown rice, teff

1/2  cup garbanzo bean flour , coconut flour ,or almond flour

1 cup starch or combination ( arrowroot, potato, tapioca , and/or cornstarch )

 

 

 

Idy’s Simple Gluten Free All Purpose Flour blend 3

 

Ratio: 3 parts whole grain to 1 part starch

Yield: 2 cups

 

1/2 cup buckwheat flour

1/2 cup brown rice flour

1/4 cup sweet brown rice flour

1/4 cup garbanzo bean flour

 

1/2 cup cornstarch

1 cup potato starch / arrowroot starch

 

Note: You can substitute millet , teff , amaranth , sorghum, nut flour for any of the other whole grain flours.

 

 

Idy’s Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Blend 4

 

Ratio: 2 3/4 cups whole grain to 1 ¼ cup starch

Yield: 4 cups

 

 

¼ cup millet flour or corn flour

½ cup sorghum / milo flour

½ cup garbanzo flour

½ cup brown rice flour

½ cup sweet brown rice flour

½ cup quinoa flour

 

½ cup potato starch

¼ cup tapioca starch

¼ cup cornstarch

¼ cup cup arrowroot starch

 

Note: You can substitute buckwheat , teff , amaranth, nut flour for any of the other whole grain flours.

 

 

Idy’s Gluten Free All Purpose Flour Blend 5

 

Ratio: 4 parts whole grain to 1 part starch

Yield: 6 cups

 

 

1 cup sorghum flour

1 cup almond meal or hazelnut meal

1/2 cup brown rice flour

1/2 cup teff flour or corn flour

½ cup millet flour or buckwheat flour

1/2 cup sweet brown rice flour

 

1 cup tapioca starch

 

Note: You can substitute buckwheat , teff , amaranth for any of the other whole grain flours.

 

 

You will be delightfully surprised though to know that you can use 100% whole grain flours  in your cake recipes and it will still come out great! I kid you not! As long as you combine in right proportions the sticky binding grain flours with the non-sticky ones , and/or use extra binder like chia seed gel or flax seed gel, you can get a great cake! The grains that bind well are buckwheat, sweet brown rice, bean flour, teff, amaranth.They absorb liquid a lot more. Use that with the regular grain flours. With the right proportion of flour, eggs, chia gel, and oil, you can achieve 100% whole grain cakes and breads that taste good and with good texture.

 

Chia Seed Gel Recipes: http://www.tealightfullyours.com/chia-seed-gel-recipe/TeaSmittenMomma


My Gluten Free 100% Whole Grain Banana Cake is an example of a 100% whole grain cake with no starches .


http://www.tealightfullyours.com/gluten-free-100-whole-grain-banana-cake/TeaSmittenMomma